New Approaches Logo - Large Oak tree with roots going down into the groundNew Approaches to Cancer through positive self help
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Surrey,
KT16 0WJ, U.K.

  

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 The first step
(from introductory booklet)

Take control. It is your health. Your body. This is why callers are usually recommended to contact their local support group. There is often a sense of confusion and isolation after a cancer diagnosis. Sharing the burden not only eases the strain on physical and emotional levels, it also gives the family courage and hope to realise that there are so many ways they can learn to help themselves.

A cancer support group is not a gloomy, introspective place. Nor is it a haven for witch doctors and food freaks. Mostly they are efficient, cheerful and unself-pitying. There is laughter and honesty.

Groups vary in size and purpose. There are those run in private homes, rather like clubs, which offer counselling, practical help and the comfort of being with others coping with similar problems. There are some with purpose-designed premises and a team of specialists working more like a medical centre. All try to liaise with local General Practitioners and hospital consultants. Most offer classes in relaxation, meditation and nutrition and advice on complementary therapies.

You will find meetings attended by men and women, many of whom face, or are recovering from the effects of, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. There will be others learning to face death, for the holistic approach to life acknowledges that there is also a "time to die", but tries to improve the quality of life whichever path a patient is following and wherever they have reached.

Costs vary. A day at a Cancer Centre may be free, or there may be a nominal charge since workers are mostly volunteers. Professional fees - for acupuncture for instance - have a sliding scale which can usually be adapted to the pocket of the patient. Never let financial worries prevent you from seeking help. Very often if you are not able to get to a centre, they will send someone to befriend you. You are only a call away, so there is no need to feel alone.

arrow pointing forwards   next>> What you can eat

 

Who we are
The holistic approach
What is cancer?
The first step
What you can eat
Feeding the spirit and the mind
5 step approach to prevention & control of ill health
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